Posts tagged food

Fiddlehead Picking | Part 3: Fiddlehead Pizza (Taken with instagram)

Fiddlehead Picking | Part 3: Fiddlehead Pizza (Taken with instagram)

Fiddlehead Picking | Part 2: Sautéed with Butter & Garlic (Taken with instagram)

Fiddlehead Picking | Part 2: Sautéed with Butter & Garlic (Taken with instagram)

Fiddlehead Picking | Part 1 (Taken with Instagram at Holliston, Town of)

Fiddlehead Picking | Part 1 (Taken with Instagram at Holliston, Town of)

"Artisan"

A few weeks ago my boyfriend and I were perusing the grocery store shelves on our weekly shopping excursion when he exclaimed, “Let’s get these new artisan Tostito chips!” Without having to look, I knew exactly what these said “artisan” chips were. I immediately went into one of my tirades over companies misusing words like artisan and bastardizing real artisan products.

As you might know, I work at an all-natural, local bagel company. Our bakers are truly making handcrafted, kettle-boiled and rotary oven baked bagels in the most traditional, old-world way. It takes approximately 24 minutes to make each bagel, and that is not including the 12-24 hours we proof our bagels. That’s A LOT of love going into one bagel. Many bagel companies don’t proof their bagels and they also don’t kettle-boil or rotary oven bake them. First, the proofing process is what my bosses call “one of the most expensive yet important parts of how we make the world’s best bagels.” By proofing the bagels, the yeast rises and the flavors start to meld together. With bagels like Cinnamon Raisin, you can really taste the difference. Secondly, kettle-boiling the bagels is KEY. Boiling the bagels is what gives the bagels their chewy crust. Without boiling the bagels, you are basically just eating bread with a hole in the center. Lastly, rotary oven are far superior to tunnel ovens. They ensure a uniform and perfectly baked product.  

With that said, our bagels are made by highly skilled artisan bakers. One of the guys has been back there for 18 years baking for us. He is a superstar and a master of the craft. So, when there companies like Tostitos and world wide chains like Burger King using the word “artisan” to describe their machine made products, it’s a little frustrating. They are have debased a word that used to perfectly describe a handcrafted product.

At this point, Zach obviously looked at me like I was crazy. All he wanted was these chips, but as I then explained to him— it’s my job to care! I want to be able to use the word artisan and not have people look at me thinking “riiiiiight.”

Fast forward to two weeks later and here I am scrolling through my twitter feed and BAM! an article telling my exact story:

http://newyork.grubstreet.com/2011/11/artisan-word-downfall.html?mid=twitter_GrubStreet 

Ranting, 

 Brooke


Oh, and these lovely photos were taken by Jessica McDaniel: http://www.boston-baby-photos.com/

I often find myself daydreaming at work about what I am going to make for dinner. Since I have the luxury of having a backyard, a porch and a grill, I almost feel inclined to use it every single night- especially after the winter we had here in Boston. The other day I had this vision: Grilled Steak Fajitas with Spicy Cilantro-Lime Dressing. I am not sure where this came from, since I have never had or made anything like this before, but it certainly turned out to be a success.
I don’t think I need to give a play-by-play on the prep or grilling process of the steak. Just don’t be a fool and over season it- the sauce is very flavorful and for the love of God, none of this well-done BS.
Spicy Cilantro-Lime Dressing (by me!):
Ingredients-
1 cup cilantro
1/2 cup lime juice
1/2 cup plain greek yogurt
1 avocado
3 tomatillos
1 jalapeno
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp cumin
1 tbsp garlic
Directions-
Broil tomatillos (take off the husk and clean) and jalapeno for 15 minutes (should see some blackening)
While they are broiling, chop cilantro, squeeze limes and put all ingredients into blender.
When the tomatillos and the jalapeno are done, cut of the stem of the jalapeno and add to blender. These will be quite juicy, so be careful when transferring.
Blend.
Mine came out to be a semi-thick cream like sauce. If your texture is a little off, add lime juice and yogurt as desired.
Grill the steak, wrap the tortillas in tin foil and grill for a couple minutes (flip after a few minutes) while you are cutting the steak, put the sauce in some jar or something to pour from (I put it in a creamer container for the spout), fill a bowl with some shredded cheese and assemble your fajita! And don’t forget to get beers to go with it- Coronas or Pacificos for me please!

I often find myself daydreaming at work about what I am going to make for dinner. Since I have the luxury of having a backyard, a porch and a grill, I almost feel inclined to use it every single night- especially after the winter we had here in Boston. The other day I had this vision: Grilled Steak Fajitas with Spicy Cilantro-Lime Dressing. I am not sure where this came from, since I have never had or made anything like this before, but it certainly turned out to be a success.

I don’t think I need to give a play-by-play on the prep or grilling process of the steak. Just don’t be a fool and over season it- the sauce is very flavorful and for the love of God, none of this well-done BS.

Spicy Cilantro-Lime Dressing (by me!):

Ingredients-

  • 1 cup cilantro
  • 1/2 cup lime juice
  • 1/2 cup plain greek yogurt
  • 1 avocado
  • 3 tomatillos
  • 1 jalapeno
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tbsp garlic

Directions-

  1. Broil tomatillos (take off the husk and clean) and jalapeno for 15 minutes (should see some blackening)
  2. While they are broiling, chop cilantro, squeeze limes and put all ingredients into blender.
  3. When the tomatillos and the jalapeno are done, cut of the stem of the jalapeno and add to blender. These will be quite juicy, so be careful when transferring.
  4. Blend.
  5. Mine came out to be a semi-thick cream like sauce. If your texture is a little off, add lime juice and yogurt as desired.

Grill the steak, wrap the tortillas in tin foil and grill for a couple minutes (flip after a few minutes) while you are cutting the steak, put the sauce in some jar or something to pour from (I put it in a creamer container for the spout), fill a bowl with some shredded cheese and assemble your fajita! And don’t forget to get beers to go with it- Coronas or Pacificos for me please!

I am so over store bought salsa.

I have had this feeling for a while now and try to make my own salsa whenever possible, but finally the other night, I bought enough ingredients to use with dinner and to have a full jar of homemade salsa to enjoy later. I suppose it’s more of a pico de gallo because I love chunky salsa (and guacamole for that matter too!) so there was no use of a food processor- just a lot of chopping! If you like it a little less chunky, a pulse or two in the food processor would be perfect.

  • 6 tomatoes
  • 3 jalapenos (warning: hot)
  • 1 medium white onion
  • 1/2 a medium red onion
  • 1 cup cilantro (I’m a fiend- so a little less if you aren’t)
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 3 limes juice (hell, I even threw in some of the pulp)
  • 1 tbsp cumin
  • 1 tsp sea salt (More can always be added but not taken away!)
  • 1 tsp chili powder

Optional/Seasonal:

  • 1 cup (2-3 ears) of grilled/pan fried corn. If pan frying it, try putting in 3 tbsps of pineapple juice and 2 tbsp EVOO. Since you are using pans now, I would probably add the garlic, salt, 1/2 the cilantro, cumin and chili powder now.
  • Sweeten it up with some diced fruit of your choice- pineapple, mango, peach etc.

On April 29th, 2011, I woke up at 5am to watch the much anticipated royal wedding. I have the tendency to need to multitask whenever I’m doing just about anything so, there couldn’t have been a better time to make English muffins for the first time! I shopped around the internet for the perfect recipe and when I came across Alton Brown’s, I was quite pleased by the reviews. They were, if I do say so myself, perfect.

Ingredients

 1/2 cup non-fat powdered milk

  1 tablespoon sugar

 1 teaspoon salt

• 1 tablespoon shortening

 1 cup hot water

• 1 envelope dry yeast

 1/8 teaspoon sugar

 1/3 cup warm water

 2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted

 Non-stick vegetable spray

* Special equipment: 3-inch metal rings (or a small tuna can with tops and bottoms removed!)

Directions

 In a bowl combine the powdered milk, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, shortening, and hot water, stir until the sugar and salt are dissolved. Let cool. In a separate bowl combine the yeast and 1/8 teaspoon of sugar in 1/3 cup of warm water and rest until yeast has dissolved. Add this to the dry milk mixture. Add the sifted flour and beat thoroughly with wooden spoon. Cover the bowl and let it rest in a warm spot for 30 minutes.

Preheat the griddle to 300 degrees F.

Add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of salt to mixture and beat thoroughly. Place metal rings onto the griddle and coat lightly with vegetable spray. Using #20 ice cream scoop, place 2 scoops into each ring and cover with a pot lid or cookie sheet and cook for 5 to 6 minutes. Remove the lid and flip rings using tongs. Cover with the lid and cook for another 5 to 6 minutes or until golden brown. Place on a cooling rack, remove rings and cool. Split with fork and serve.

No, your eyes aren’t playing tricks on you.
Last weekend I dined at Boston’s newest restaurant- Legal Harborside. Nothing makes this girl happier than a well designed building and secondly, delicious food. The head chef just happens to be a friend and instead of ordering dishes, he insisted on stuffing us full with a 10 course meal of his choices. At about meal 5, this dish was placed in front of me. MONSTER PASTA?! What issss thissss? Bucatini! Bucatini is a thick spaghetti-like pasta with a hole running through the center. A week later I am still thinking about this pasta and encourage you to hustle over to Legal Harborside and try Bucatini all’Amatriciani yourself (yes, I’m plugging pasta at a seafood restaurant). http://www.legalseafoods.com/restaurants/boston-legal-harborside

No, your eyes aren’t playing tricks on you.

Last weekend I dined at Boston’s newest restaurant- Legal Harborside. Nothing makes this girl happier than a well designed building and secondly, delicious food. The head chef just happens to be a friend and instead of ordering dishes, he insisted on stuffing us full with a 10 course meal of his choices. At about meal 5, this dish was placed in front of me. MONSTER PASTA?! What issss thissss? Bucatini! Bucatini is a thick spaghetti-like pasta with a hole running through the center. A week later I am still thinking about this pasta and encourage you to hustle over to Legal Harborside and try Bucatini all’Amatriciani yourself (yes, I’m plugging pasta at a seafood restaurant). http://www.legalseafoods.com/restaurants/boston-legal-harborside

Cut. Scoop. Chop. Chop. Chop. Mix. Scoop back into shell. 
Every guest got their own little bowl of guacamole and was very happy.  
♥ Brooke

Cut. Scoop. Chop. Chop. Chop. Mix. Scoop back into shell. 

Every guest got their own little bowl of guacamole and was very happy.  

♥ Brooke